Swooshable

Two High

When it comes to writing small, you can't get smaller than Two High. It's name comes from the height - it's two studs high. Oh yes. We went with a pun on this one.

It's a surprisingly expressive font at its scale. The tradeoff, however, is versatility. Many pieces are floating free, so you'll need to treat it as a mosaic which can be limiting. Start by building a frame and place the characters in that. If you're not particularly purist you can use transparent stickers to keep it in place.

The small scale enables you to do some fun things. The grooves in the tiles becomes a usable feature, for instance! Look at the O. By placing the groove outwards we get a more rounded appearance. The Z remains a tricky character to get 100% right - if you come up with an alternative let me know.

This font has a rich and varied history, which Dan has kindly expanded upon. I first saw it when William Howard posted about it, but variants seems to have been in use by LEGOLAND builders a long time. LEGOLAND Discovery Center Chicago even created a demonstration on YouTube. There's a version in the Ultimate LEGO Book from 1999. The general LEGO community have improved upon it. Contributors include AceBricks, Kockamania.hu, Igor Makarov and myself.

This is what Two High looks like written in its own font.
In this road example we utilize Two High to create a stop. The entire plate is studs up covered with tiles - except the lettering, which lies down.
AceBricks has used the font to create several nifty nameplates.
A variant with minimal use of cheese slopes by LEGOLAND Discovery Center Chicago.

Story Time

Steve and John did their job every day, yet they never stopped to consider that their tools might be too small for the task. After all: everything is cool when you're part of a team.